Bradbury Thompson

 

Life and work

Communication Arts opened an article on Bradbury Thompson, in its March/April 1999 issue, like this: “When it came to the blending of photography, typography and color, nobody did it better than Bradbury Thompson… In his own quiet way, he expanded the boundaries of the printed page and influenced the design of a generation of art directors.” 

Thompson was born in Topeka, Kansas. He attended Washburn College and graduated in 1934 . A facility called the Bradbury Thompson Alumni Center now stands at Washburn University. In 1937, Thompson designed the college’s mascot, “The Ichabod.”

Thompson was art director of Mademoiselle magazine for fifteen years beginning in 1945.

A signature design from Thompson was his Washburn College Bible. This book was one of the first to use the Sabon typeface designed by Jan Tschichold and released in 1967.

Thompson served on the faculty of Yale University. He received the AIGA Gold Medal in 1975. He received the Type Director’s Club Medal in 1986.

He died on November 1, 1995.

Alphabet 26

Thompson developed Alphabet 26 or a “monoalphabet” – an alphabet consisted of just one case (instead of using separate uppercase and lowercase letterforms as typefaces typically do). His monoalphabet was a modern serif (comparable to Bodoni) with lowercase a, e, m and n mixed with uppercase B, D, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, P, Q, R, T, U and Y. (The forms of C/c, O/o, S/s, V/v, W/w, X/x and Z/z are essentially the same in uppercase and lowercase in the first place.)

Alphabet 26 does not eliminate uppercase; however, uppercase letters are simply larger versions of their lowercase counterparts. This was intended to regularize the letters of the alphabet, making them more logical and intuitive, and also making learning the alphabet easier for children. Thompson first published the alphabet in a Westvaco Inspirations for Printers

The set of letters for Alphabet 26 thus appears:

b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

 

Advertisements

~ by sketchbitch on January 8, 2009.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: